H1N1 Vaccine Risks Have Some Parents Opting Out

When It Comes to Flu Shots, Give Me the Flu Instead

Swine flu may come, even if you wash your hands and use good judgment. But with the stated H1N1 vaccine risks, will you be getting the shot? (Photo: flickr.com)

Swine flu may come, even if you wash your hands and use good judgment. But with the stated H1N1 vaccine risks, will you be getting the shot? (Photo: flickr.com)

Flu season is fast approaching, and many people are concerned about whether H1N1 – more commonly known as the “swine flu” – will devastate entire communities. When cooler heads prevail, however, it’s easy to see that H1N1 isn’t all that different from any other flu in any other year.

If you aren’t an infant, elderly or suffering from a serious health ailment that would make contracting the flu a danger (this is the biggest thing, truly), there isn’t much to worry about.

Wash your hands regularly, use a surgical mask if you’re sick and have to go out in public and deal with H1N1 the way you would any normal flu. Take in nutrients, get rest and try not to expose others.

It’s common sense, the same way same day loans can float a budget in the short term during an emergency.

There Are H1N1 Vaccine Risks, Anyway

Some people will opt for the H1N1 vaccine, whether it is because they are at risk or that they think flu shots are essential. However, there are medical experts that have stated their concerns over H1N1 vaccine risks. This leaves people in the position of having to decide whether the vaccine is worth the risk or worse than simply contracting the flu and letting normal immune systems deal with the invader.

According to the Center For Disease Control, high risk individuals are children under 2; those over 65; pregnant ladies; people with chronic asthma, diabetes or HIV; and children younger than 19 who are involved in aspirin therapy. For these groups, the shot may be worth it. There are even locations that will deliver it for free or at a discounted rate, depending upon a patient’s financial situation.

But What About GBC Risk?

Also known as Guillain-Barré syndrome, it is an autoimmune disorder that can lead to death. However, Dr. Jennifer Ashton estimates that this risk is “only 1 in a million vaccines.”

However, since I’m not in an “at risk” group, I’ll take the flu instead. Since I have young children, I have more to consider. Yet it is my belief – based upon my understanding of the evidence – that H1N1 vaccine risks are just another sign that the more you look for loopholes, the more you’ll find.

I am not concerned about my children dying due to swine flu. Common sense treatment and doctors (if necessary) are all they’ll likely need if the swine flu comes to call. If I need financial backup, I’ll consider same day loans.

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